BA (Hons) Games Development and Futures

BA (Hons) Games Development and Futures

Turn your love for games into a career and become part of a thriving global gaming industry.

If your ambition is to make games, then this course, taught from our ACM London Campus, builds the skills you need to fulfil that dream and carve out a career in gaming.

Whether you want to be a programmer, a designer, an artist, sound designer or work in the business and commerce side of the gaming industry, you can put your knowledge into practice with your fellow students, supported by tutors who are working at the heart of the gaming industry.

You’ll make completed, publishable games, using an interdisciplinary approach that distinguishes this Games Development and Futures course from the rest. Supported by our world-class teaching faculty and Industry Link teams, you’ll gain exactly the type of experience needed for employment in the games industry or to start up your own independent game development studio.

The course is advertised subject to validation by Middlesex University, and we will update this page with further information in due course.

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Course Overview

Throughout the course, you’ll learn about the commerce, theory and design of digital games. As you progress and in true ACM style, project teamwork will be at the heart of your learning experience, as recommended by the creative industry. You’ll also be paired with an expert Mentor, who’ll offer a unique insight into the industry and help you build contacts.

All of the knowledge acquired along the way is complemented by the development of skills that are gained in your specialist area. There are five to choose from (Games design, games engines and programming, art and animation, applied music and audio, creative business practices), given the diversity of the gaming industry.

Games Development and Futures Modules

  • GAM401 Introduction to game futures: working practices, technologies and contexts
    This module enables students to understand applications and genres of the games industry and to explore how these are being used in other industries to problem-solve and innovate. It examines the principles and terminology used in professional contexts and requires students to research and investigate the potential futures of games.
  • GAM402 Games, culture and society
    This module enables students to understand the cultural and social aspects of games and gaming and to connect the theory with the practice. Students will consider and compare the impact, structure and method of gaming in global culture and societies. The module requires students to identify and explore themes to review a variety of formats and technologies through this lens.
  • GAM403 Digital storytelling in the creative industries
    This module enables students to examine digital storytelling across a range of media. Students will consider and compare the purpose, structure and method of story-telling in different formats and platforms and to different audiences. The module requires students to review creative industries practices of digital storytelling in a variety of formats and technologies.
  • GAM404 Psychology and biology of games from individual to mass participation
    This module enables students to understand the impact of games and gaming on physical and mental health. Students will consider and contrast the potential and actual positive and negative impact of gaming in different contexts. The module requires students to consider and analyse the components of video games to support or challenge current research on this topic.
  • GAM405 Games Laboratory: Game design, game engine and programming
    This module enables students to engage in developing a game by rotating across the key disciplines and roles on mini-projects or one large project and are continuously reviewed by the Games Tutors and their student peers for contribution and potential contribution.
  • GAM406 Games Laboratory: Art and animation
    This module enables students to develop their practical skills and contextual knowledge in this discipline within the context of GAM405.
  • GAM407 Games laboratory: Game play, applied music and audio
    This module enables students to develop their practical skills and contextual knowledge in this discipline within the context of GAM405.
  • GAM408 Games laboratory: Creative business practices
    This module enables students to develop their practical skills and contextual knowledge in this discipline within the context of GAM405.
  • GAM501 Games laboratory 2: Agile and collaborative indie development
    This module enables student to engage in an indie game environment in the following activities: • Interdisciplinary communication, problem-solving and collaboration: practices and tools for synchronous and asynchronous teamwork. • Individual and group coaching: in role and on and off project; • Reflective journaling / logging: recording individual and community problems, solutions and learning, learning how to learn through practice and practice-theory-practice cycles; • Iteration and testing: agile, design, build, test, refine, deliver, pitch, review; Individual and Community Games Curation and Lexicon: curating and referencing individual and teamwork to current or historic professional practices within an indie games context.
  • GAM502 Indie: Games design
    This module enables students to focus on discipline specific skills, first experienced within Level 4, in preparation for the Indie Game Project GAM501. This enables students to further develop specialist practical skills and contextual knowledge in this discipline within the context of GAM405.
  • GAM503 Indie: games engines and programming
    This module enables students to focus on discipline specific skills, first experienced within Level 4, in preparation for the Indie Game Project GAM501. This enables students to further develop specialist practical skills and contextual knowledge in this discipline within the context of GAM405.
  • GAM504 Indie: Art and animation
    This module enables students to focus on discipline specific skills, first experienced within Level 4, in preparation for the Indie Game Project GAM501. This enables students to further develop specialist practical skills and contextual knowledge in this discipline within the context of GAM406.
  • GAM505 Indie: Applied music and audio
    This module enables students to focus on discipline specific skills, first experienced within Level 4, in preparation for the Indie Game Project GAM501. This enables students to further develop specialist practical skills and contextual knowledge in this discipline within the context of GAM407.
  • GAM506 Indie: Creative business practices
    This module enables students to focus on discipline specific skills, first experienced within Level 4, in preparation for the Indie Game Project GAM501. This enables students to further develop specialist practical skills and contextual knowledge in this discipline within the context of GAM408.
  • GAM507 Games laboratory 3: Agile and collaborative AAA game development
    This module enables student to engage in a AAA (major) game environment in the following activities: • disciplinary-specific communication, problem-solving and collaboration: practices and tools for synchronous and asynchronous teamwork. • Individual and group coaching: in role and on and off project; • Reflective journaling / logging: recording individual and community problems, solutions and learning, learning how to learn through practice and practice-theory-practice cycles; • Iteration and testing in one specific discipline: agile, design, build, test, ...
  • GAM508 AAA: Games design
    This module enables students to further develop specialist practical skills and contextual knowledge in this discipline, within the context of GAM502 and GAM501
  • GAM509 AAA: games engines and programming
    This module enables students to further develop specialist practical skills and contextual knowledge in this discipline within the context of GAM503 and GAM501
  • GAM510 AAA: Art and animation
    This module enables students to further develop specialist practical skills and contextual knowledge in this discipline within the context of GAM504 and GAM501
  • GAM511 AAA: Applied music and audio
    This module enables students to further develop specialist practical skills and contextual knowledge in this discipline within the context of GAM505 and GAM501.
  • GAM512 AAA: Creative business practices
    This module enables students to further develop specialist practical skills and contextual knowledge in this discipline within the context of GAM506 and GAM501.
  • GAM603 Games laboratory 4: Games design
    This module enables student to engage in developing a game for audiences of the future working with a non-traditional games environment in the following activities: disciplinary-specific communication, problem-solving and collaboration: practices and tools for synchronous and asynchronous teamwork. Individual and group coaching: in role and on and off project; Reflective journaling / logging: recording individual and community problems, solutions and learning, learning how to learn through practice and practice-theory-practice cycles; Iteration and testing in one specific discipline: agile, design, build, test, refine, deliver, pitch, review; Individual and Community Games Curation and Lexicon: curating and referencing individual and teamwork to current or historic professional ...
  • GAM604 Games laboratory 4: Games engines and programming
    This module is selected by those students who have demonstrated commitment, further developed their skills and problem-solving abilities within this discipline for the Audiences of the future Game Project GAM501. This enables students to further develop specialist practical skills and contextual knowledge in this discipline within the context of GAM513
  • GAM605 Games laboratory 4: Art and animation
    This module is selected by those students who have demonstrated commitment, further developed their skills and problem-solving abilities within this discipline for the Audiences of the future Game Project GAM501. This enables students to further develop specialist practical skills and contextual knowledge in this discipline within the context of GAM513
  • GAM606 Games laboratory 4: Applied Music and Audio
    This module is selected by those students who have demonstrated commitment, further developed their skills and problem-solving abilities within this discipline for the Audiences of the future Game Project GAM501. This enables students to further develop specialist practical skills and contextual knowledge in this discipline within the context of GAM513
  • GAM607 Games laboratory 4: Creative business practices
    This module is selected by those students who have demonstrated commitment, further developed their skills and problem-solving abilities within this discipline for the Audiences of the future Game Project GAM501. This enables students to further develop specialist practical skills and contextual knowledge in this discipline within the context of GAM513

Ready for ACM?

Jump over to our Apply Now page, select the relevant course and fill in our online form. Good luck!

This course is advertised subject to validation by Middlesex University. We will update this page with further information in due course.

Ready for ACM?

Jump over to our Apply Now page, select the relevant course and fill in our online form. Good luck!

Course Details

MODE OF STUDY
Campus based, full-time.
London | 3 Years

FHEQ LEVEL: 6
Degree 360 Credits

UCAS CODES
UCAS Institution Code: A48
BA (Hons) Games Development and Futures
Course codes: Art and Animation – GDAR | Applied Music and Audio – GDAU | Games Design – GDDS | Games Engines and Programming – GAPR | Creative Business Practices – GBIZ

Entry Requirements

All candidates may be required to attend an audition / interview.

LONDON | 3 YEAR DEGREE

Minimum age 18

All candidates should hold at least two Cs at A-Level (or an equivalent Level 3 qualification), possessing a minimum of 64 UCAS points*.

We normally require Grade C/4 GCSE (or an equivalent qualification) in English. Candidates should be capable of using the English language fluently, and able to structure arguments and present evidence to a standard appropriate to study at Level ‘4’. Where the application materials appear insufficient to form a clear judgement on the candidate’s fluency, additional documentary evidence (e.g. recent essays) will be called for. Applicants for whom English is a second language are required to have achieved IELTS level 6.0 (with a minimum of 5.5 in each component) or equivalent qualification.

We welcome applications from those who might have completed alternative quali cations, and/or have prior experience. All applications will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

* New UCAS 2017 tariff system.

Details regarding the English Language requirements for Middlesex University programmes can be viewed here.

Fees & financing information can be found here.

This course is advertised subject to validation by Middlesex University. We will update this page with further information in due course.